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Great educators from top rated schools around the world are coming together in Gurgaon for the first-ever annual meeting of the Global Schools’ Alliance...

Great educators from top rated schools around the world are coming together in Gurgaon for the first-ever annual meeting of the Global Schools’ Alliance (GSA). The agenda for this year’s event is “Co-creating the world’s best schools”. Due to the fact that the first and only school from India, Vega School, was the latest addition to the group, the head of GSA, Lene Jensby Lange from Denmark, chose India as the host country for the inaugural meeting.

Between 13th and 16th October, the heads and founders of progressive schools in the US, UK, New Zealand, Cambodia, Indonesia, Denmark, and India will travel to Delhi NCR to attend the 3 day annual conference and exchange research and best practises about how children learn. The GSA will also set goals on how to collaborate with each other for the coming years and select projects on which children can work together internationally. The three day conference will conclude with a Gala dinner where the international guests will speak with about 250 parents in Gurgaon whose children will form the first class of the school.

Sandy Hooda, Co-founder of Vega Schools, said, “Great educators from truly amazing schools like Allan Kjaer Andersen, Director ofØrestad Gymnasium in Denmark and Sandra Jenkins from Freemans Bay School in New Zealand, are coming here to share their experiences. We think there is a lot for Indian schools to learn from their counterparts and help put the child at the centre of learning.”

GSA head Lene Lange finds Gurgaon a very interesting place educationally. She said, “I see a lot of schools coming up in the region who intend to be progressive in nature. Schools in India still need to change a lot in order to become truly progressive 21st century schools”.

Within the GSA, partner schools and faculty are continuously learning from each other. Schools exchange research studies, best practises, and host other member schools’ teachers for visits and teaching opportunities. Students attending member schools also benefit from the partnership. Barbara Cavanagh from Albany Senior High School in New Zealand finds it very important for children from different kinds of schools to work together on projects, “Through online facilities children are able to collaborate with students in other countries on projects. By doing this they learn about different cultures and how to work together with people from different backgrounds. Our students are really excited about this.”